African-Americans resettle in Africa

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Ghana is the first African country to officially open its doors to people of African descent from all over the world. 

In Prampram, a town just an hour’s drive east of Ghana’s capital Accra, many holiday houses line the shores of the South Atlantic Ocean. One of them belongs to Jerome Thompson. Located only 500 meters from the waterMr. Thompson, a native of Maryland in the United States, retired to Ghana 11 years ago. He first visited the West African country on a tour in 2000. “I fell in love with Ghana and its people,” he recalled, during an interview with Africa Renewal. “It was good seeing black people, my people, in charge of the country (Ghana).” 

“I was so ready to turn my back on the United States,” he says, adding: “We did so much for the US, yet they don’t want to see us as first-class citizens.” 

Currently, there are around 200 million people in the Americas identifying themselves as of African descent, according to the United Nations. Millions more live in other parts of the world, outside of the African continent, and in most cases they experience racism and discrimination.

To promote the respect for and protection of their human rights, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 2015–2024 as the “The International Decade for the People of African Descent”, to be marked annually on 25 March.

Right of Abode

Ghana, from whose shores the majority of 15 million Africans passed into slavery, has invited its descendants in the diaspora to return home.  The country has had a long history, from the days of its first president, Kwame Nkrumah, of encouraging the return of persons of African descent to help with the continent’s development.

Read the full article by:  Efam Dovi From Africa Renewal

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YES, BUT THEY DON’T LIKE US!?

One of the first things many African-Americans will say when confronted with the idea of moving to Africa is, “Africans don’t like us.” Top that with the a third-world images America has bombarded into our psyche of Africa with starving children, grass huts and barren lands with rebels riding shotgun in old dirty jeeps, makes most African-Americans consider every other country before the motherland — but they should be well aware by now of the manipulative trickery and deceit of our government and consider even if Africans don’t like us, it would still be better among them then what we are tolerating here.

One of the most successful tactics of British soldiers to plant fear was to show “images of dead bodies and ruined houses” to threatened the people.  — Virginia Woolf

The American and UK media outlets are going out of their way to covertly insinuate and convince Black people of the impoverished conditions of Africa, a continent 3 times the size of America and the richest land on this planet, would be a detrimental move and that blacks would be far better off staying here or moving to another European country than going back to Africa.

And yes, they are playing both ends against the middle, spreading lies to Africans about us like they spread lies to us about them but as in an old African Proverb, but rather than trying to have that conversation about race with them that they don’t want to hear, we should have a talk with our brothers and sisters in Africa. I urge you to remember that is the “hunter” (white man) speaking when it reads, “Until the Lion tells his story, the Hunter will forever be glorified.”

Witness recently when President Obama visited Kenya, the only footage shown was of Obama visiting the undeveloped rural villages and impoverished back towns (the same conditions can be found in America with the right cameras) but they never showed the luxury accommodations where the president resided during his stay. However as you can see in the photos below, Kenya’s Downtowns and cities are un-paralleled in beauty and modernization to any place in the US.

No you can’t go over there “slapping five’s” any more than you could in any European country, especially Canada, America’s twin, who houses blacks in the same invisibly segregated sections and classes we are far too accustomed to here. –DVB

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Whether as descendants of the victims of the transatlantic slave trade or as more recent migrants, they constitute some of the poorest and most marginalized groups. Studies and findings by international and national bodies demonstrate that people of African descent still have limited access to quality education, health services, housing and social security.

In many cases, their situation remains largely invisible, and insufficient recognition and respect has been given to the efforts of people of African descent to seek redress for their present condition. They all too often experience discrimination in their access to justice, and face alarmingly high rates of police violence, together with racial profiling.

Furthermore, their degree of political participation is often low, both in voting and in occupying political positions.

In addition, people of African descent can suffer from multiple, aggravated or intersecting forms of discrimination based on other related grounds, such as age, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, social origin, property, disability, birth, or other status.

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The promotion and protection of human rights of people of African descent has been a priority concern for the United Nations. See full UN.org article

Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 18 November 2014 – PDF

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