Barbados

World Class Villa La Maison Michelle: Black-owned private luxury resort in Barbados

It took six years for African American husband and wife entrepreneurs Michelle and Guy Jenkins to open their luxury resort in the Caribbean. Located on the west coast of Barbados, Villa La Maison Michelle is the only Black American-owned private luxury resort in Barbados.

Villa La Maison Michelle was designed by Michelle herself, and her designs showcase luxury beyond your imagination. The wow factor begins with wrought iron gates leading the way to a luxurious split-level home with panoramic views everywhere you look and an open air design, with spa luxury services supported by a butler, two housekeepers, and a landscaper.

There are open terraces, five-star dining services, a private gym, a spa, and two waterfalls on the grounds. The resort is private, yet easily connected to direct air flight service. It can accommodate special events for up to 500 people. The weather is 85 degrees all year with cool breezes, and the water is clear blue. 

A family legacy

Michelle Jenkins’ father bought the property 50 years ago as a legacy for the family. Michelle and Guy have turned the property into a very desirable resort that was also a good investment for them. It was also a way to establish their financial independence. With hard work, time and patience, the couple has created a very stable business.

  • Situated in Lancaster Ridge, St. James, Barbados
  • Adjacent to the exclusive Royal Westmoreland properties
  • Located on private ridge looking over a 18-hole world-class PGA golf course in Royal Westmoreland
  • Within 5 minutes from world-renowned 5 star Sandy Lane Resort

Ideal for special events: weddings, business conferences, private parties, Yoga/Spa/Golf retreats, etc.

What’s next?

The Jenkins have expressed an interest in expanding business to include more business-related opportunities, such as employee retreats, health and wellness retreats, music recording sessions, and more. They are even looking at a second property in Barbados. There is no doubt that whatever they do will be done with all the luxury shown in their first resort.

For more details about the resort and/or to book a reservation, visit www.lammbarbadosvilla.com

Sources: BlackBusiness.org, LammBarbadosVilla.com
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Stephen Wiltshire: Autistic Skyline Artist

 

Stephen Wiltshire is a 33-year-old autistic man with an extraordinary talent. He is one of less than 100 people in the world who is recognized as an autistic savant. Whereas some savants excel in mathematics or music, Stephen is an accomplished artist, and is capable of producing highly accurate drawings of buildings and cities after seeing them just once.

Wiltshire was born in London, England, in 1974 to West Indian parents, His father, Colvin was a native of Barbados, and his mother, Geneva, is a native of St. Lucia Wiltshire was mute when young. At the age of three, he was diagnosed as autistic. The same year, his father died in a motorbike accident.

At the age of five, Stephen was sent to Queensmill School in London where he expressed interest in drawing. The instructors at Queensmill School encouraged him to speak by temporarily taking away his art supplies so that he would be forced to ask for them. Stephen responded by making sounds and eventually uttered his first word—”paper.” He learned to speak fully at the age of nine. His early illustrations depicted animals and cars; he is still extremely interested in American cars and is said to have an encyclopedic knowledge of them.

When he was about seven, Stephen became fascinated with sketching landmark London buildings. After being shown a book of photos depicting the devastation wrought by earthquakes, he began to create detailed architectural drawings of imaginary cityscapes. He began to communicate through his art. His teachers encouraged his drawing, and with their aid Wiltshire learned to speak at the age of five.[1] At the age of eight, he started drawing imaginary post-earthquake cityscapes and cars. When he was ten, Wiltshire drew a sequence of drawings of London landmarks, one for each letter, that he called a “London Alphabet.”

In 1987, Wiltshire was part of the BBC program The Foolish Wise Ones. Drawings, a collection of his works, was published that same year.  Between 1995 and his graduation in 1998, Wiltshire attended the City and Guilds of London Art School in Kennington, Lambeth, South London.