melanian news

Trayvon Receives Posthumous Bachelor’s Degree in Aeronautical Science

Martin had a “love of flying”

On May 13, 2017 Trayvon Martin will be honored with posthumous bachelor’s degree in aeronautical science from Florida Memorial University.

The bachelor’s degree in “Aeronautical Science with a concentration in Flight Education” will be conferred to Trayvon Martin, the school said, “in honor of the steps he took during his young life toward becoming a pilot.”

Florida Memorial University is a historically black college in Miami Gardens, Florida where Trayvon Martin lived at the time of his death.

Martin had a “love of flying,” the school says, and had aspired to become a pilot.

Sabrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, Martin’s parents, will accept the degree on their son’s behalf at Florida Memorial University’s commencement ceremony on May 13, the school announced this week. Born in February 1995, Martin would be 22 years old, an age many US college students attain a bachelor’s degree.

Fulton is an alumnus of the school, and the university already houses the Trayvon Martin Foundation, co-founded by Trayvon’s parents.

Source: Reuters, CNN, MSN

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Is the New Proposed Legislation to Provide Reparations for African Americans Reasonable?

un-panel-reparationsWashington, DC — On February 10, 2017, proposed legislation was submitted to the DC Board of Elections. It is a model for legislators to provide opportunities for previous slave owners, and those that participated in enslavement of African Americans families to make amends.

The proposed legislation submitted by John Cheeks, head of the United States Citizens Recovery Initiative Alliance Inc. (USCRIA), is the first legislation to provide benefits, at no cost to the taxpayers. It is also an opportunity for individual families, industries, businesses, faith-based institutions, governments and others to be held accountable.

The Legislation will help descendants of American Slaves, many of whom live in poor, underserved, and high crime areas in the United States. The benefits are not handouts, and differ from other historical reparations, such as those given to Japanese citizens entered during WW II and Native Americans.

The benefits include:

  1.  Aid to businesses
  2.  Providing educational opportunities
  3.  Improving Health
  4.  Providing Mental Health, Alcohol and Substance Abuse care
  5.  Housing Ownership
  6.  Financial Protection
  7.  Veterans Rights
  8.  Credit Acceptance
  9.  Career Rights

Cheeks comments, “All benefits are designed to improve life for individuals, families and communities. In doing so, the nation benefits.”

His proposal is that these benefits will be paid by major U.S. and international corporations and foreign governments which fostered and participated in slave trade. Budgets are being prepared for distribution of funds collected from those entities that participated in some way with slavery.

Eligibility criteria have been proposed which include proof by DNA testing. Those claiming benefits must be 40% descendants of slaves, and born in the United States.

The proposed law, the DC Recovery Act, objective is to restore identities, cure injuries and provide opportunities and justice to families that were subjected to inhumane treatment.

The proposed legislation was drafted over a year, by a team of experts and citizens working with USCRIA, and was submitted to the DC Board or Elections, on the same date as the United States Congress initiated the Fugitive Slave Law on February 12, 1793.  BlackNews.com

For the complete text of the proposed legislation, go to www.uscria.com/legislation.html

Arguments Against Reparations

The most famous statement of the arguments against reparations comes from David Horowitz, a conservative author in Los Angeles, who took out a series of advertisements in college newspapers in the spring of 2001. His advertisement, entitled, “Ten Reasons Why Reparations for Slavery are a Bad Idea and Racist, Too,” established the basis for the arguments against reparations.

At Brown University, students concerned about the effects of hate speech over campus life seized nearly 4,000 copies of the Brown Daily Herald. At Duke, more than one hundred students demonstrated outside President Nan Keohane’s office demanding that The Chronicle, their campus newspaper, provide a full-page of ad space for students to respond to Horowitz’s attack and that they forfeit the $793.80 fee they received from Horowitz.

At the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a group of progressive students calling themselves “On The Wake of Emancipation” responded to Horowitz’s claim that Black Americans should feel grateful to whites for freeing them from slavery by staging a ceremony of mock appreciation in which students dressed in black, and marched to the steps of Saunders Hall — a campus building named after the founder of the North Carolina chapter of the Ku Klux Klan.

What’s Horowitz’s Agenda?

Horowitz has been paying an average of $800 to $1,000 for each ad that is published. His original intent was to publish in fifty campus newspapers, which would have cost between $40 -$50,000.

Funding for these advertisements supposedly comes from his Center for the Study of Popular Culture, an organization Adolph Reed has derisively referred to as “nothing more than a phone number and mail drop.” While Horowitz is a successful writer, a Guggenheim Fellow, and the editor of Front Page magazine, it seems doubtful that anyone short of the very wealthy would spend this sort of money.

Who is really fronting the cash for Horowitz’s campaign of misinformation?  Read Full Story: Solidarity-us.org

Melanian News Editor’s Note:

The Ten Reasons Why Reparations for Blacks is a Bad Idea for Blacks – and Racist Too by David Horowitz is such an atrocity to the dignity of African-Americans and the history of our forefathers suffering I will not display it on Melanian News nor will I link to it for your perusal—Google it because it is relevant to know what is on the narrow minds of those white Americans who believe what they are told for the benefit of themselves.

It is clearly propaganda that has been circulating in the collective consciousness of white America for many years and not for one instance do I believe David Horowitz acted on his own volition in the preparation of this reprehensible deed nor on his own conviction to afford the tremendous cost of circulating full-page ads of it in newspapers around the country—he is the “fall guy” of an initiative far greater than himself.

In a nation of people who rely on media to guide and inform them they must be given the ten talking points to support an argument against this long overdue reckoning  as we reach the apex of time to address an indisputable wrong –DVB

UN panel says the U.S. owes reparations to African-Americans

The UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent said that compensation is necessary to combat the disadvantages caused by 245 years of legally allowing the sale of people based on the color of their skin.

The U.N. group warned that the U.S. has not confronted its legacy of “racial terrorism.”

The report, which is non-binding, specified that reparations can come in a variety of ways, including educational opportunities, psychological rehabilitation, debt cancellation and formal apologies.

Some institutions have started to take these steps. Georgetown University announced earlier this month it would offering free tuition for descendants of the 272 slaves that were sold in 1838 to help pay the university’s debts.

The U.N. report also linked past injustices to recent police killings of black men that have sparked protests across the U.S.

“Contemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the past racial terror of lynching,” the report said.

The U.S. created a reparations plan in the immediate aftermath of the Civil War that stated that freed families would be granted “forty acres of till-able land” and a mule from the Union Army. The plan, proposed by Union General William T. Sherman after meetings with black community leaders in Savannah, Georgia, was reversed by President Andrew Johnson and the land was returned to plantation owners.  PBS.org

40 Acres and a Mule: Who Came Up With the Idea?

Here’s how this radical proposal — which must have completely blown the minds of the rebel Confederates — actually came about. The abolitionists Charles Sumner and Thaddeus Stevens and other Radical Republicans had been actively advocating land redistribution “to break the back of Southern slaveholders’ power,” as Myers observed. But Sherman’s plan only took shape after the meeting that he and Stanton held with those black ministers, at 8:00 p.m., Jan. 12, on the second floor of Charles Green’s mansion on Savannah’s Macon Street. In its broadest strokes, “40 acres and a mule” was their idea.  Read the Full Story:  PBS.org – Many Rivers to Cross

Yeah, yeah I get it … ”PEOPLE DIED FOR MY RIGHT TO VOTE”

 

It’s an outdated, tired line of psychological manipulation (guilt trip) used as a means to influence society to elect their own systematic loss of inherent freedoms and independence by making them think they MUST make a choice… it’s called SUFFRAGE.

But the truth is PEOPLE ARE STILL DYING and more people have died BECAUSE of our right to vote then those who have died FOR the right. Take a look at the death tolls in the same war that’s been going on for the 4 different elections we have voted in; deaths are still rising regardless of who we vote for because we choose from the choices of the manipulators who replace our freedoms with fears…that’s called SUFFERANCE!

 

SUFFRAGE – The right to vote, especially in a political election.

SUFFERANCE – Passive permission resulting from lack of interference; tolerance, especially of something wrong or illegal.

Psychological manipulation is a type of social influence that aims to change the behavior or perception of others through abusive, deceptive, or underhanded tactics.[1] By advancing the interests of the manipulator, often at another’s expense, such methods could be considered exploitative, abusive, devious, and deceptive. Social influence is not necessarily negative. For example, doctors can try to convince patients to change unhealthy habits. The process of manipulation involves bringing an unknowing victim under the domination of the manipulator, often using deception, and using the victim to serve their own purposes.

–DVB

A Real Choice: Jill Stein / Ajamu Baraka

Stein says this election year presents an important historic opportunity to work together right now just to break through this stranglehold and challenge the two parties right out of the gate because the meaningful benchmark for third parties would be to win 5 percent of the popular vote which would lead the Federal Election Commission to confer the classification of “minor party,” which means they’d get easier ballot access and be eligible for matching public funds.

Dr. Jill Stein was the Green Party’s 2012 candidate for President. She holds the current record for most votes ever received by a woman candidate for President of the United States in the general election. She is a mother, an organizer, physician, and pioneering environmental-health advocate.

The 2016 presidential race features two of the most disliked candidates in electoral history, which has given a boost to Jill Stein, a 66-year-old Harvard-trained physician from Massachusetts who’s running on the Green Party ticket.

For instance, Stein favors a single-payer health care system, which she claims would cost taxpayers nothing. She also says she would pour federal money into the clean energy sector and end our use of fossil fuels by the year 2030.

Stein is the only candidate bold enough to address the epidemic problem with vaccine poisoning threaten and entire future generation and has been battling the perception that the Green Party is anti-vaccine after she told the Washington Post that there were real questions that needed to be addressed especially with regards to small amounts of mercury once found in childhood vaccines.

Stein calls the media coverage of her statements misleading and characterizes it as the “birther” issue of this election, claiming that she’s only calling for reforms to the FDA, which she sees as corrupted by lobbyists.

But because of the biased media control, the majority of voters are not even aware that Jill Stein and Gary Johnson are legitimate presidential candidates under the Green and Liberal Parties, respectively; and hardly if anything know what their running position statements are.

As a practicing physician, Jill became aware of the links between toxic exposures and illness emerging in the 1990s. She began to fight for a healthy environment as a human right, assisting non profits, community groups and Native Americans combating environmental injustice and racism in dangerous exposures like lead and mercury in air and water pollution, incinerators and land fills, toxic waste sites and more. She helped lead the fight to clean up the “Filthy Five” coal plants in Massachusetts, raising the bar nationally to a cleaner standard for coal plants. She helped close a toxic medical waste incinerator in Lawrence, MA, one of the poorest communities in New England. She played a key role in rewriting the Massachusetts fish advisories to better protect women and children, Native Americans and immigrants from mercury contamination. She also helped preserve the moratorium on new toxic trash incinerators in Massachusetts.

Having witnessed the power of lobbyists and campaign contributions to block health, environmental and worker protections, Jill became an advocate for campaign finance reform, and worked to help pass the Clean Election Law by voter referendum. This law was passed by a 2-1 margin, but was later repealed by the overwhelmingly Democratic Massachusetts Legislature on an unrecorded voice vote. This sabotage of campaign finance reform by the Democratic Party was a pivotal event in Jill’s political development, confirming her growing allegiance to the Green Party.

jill-stein

Meet Jill Stein

 

 

 

Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

Baraka is a human rights defender whose experience spans four decades of domestic and international education and activism, Ajamu Baraka is a veteran grassroots organizer whose roots are in the Black Liberation Movement and anti-apartheid and Central American solidarity struggles.

Baraka is an internationally recognized leader of the emerging human rights movement in the U.S. and has been at the forefront of efforts to apply the international human rights framework to social justice advocacy in the U.S. for more than 25 years. As such, he has provided human rights trainings for grassroots activists across the country, has given briefings on human rights to the U.S. Congress, and has appeared before and provided statements to various United Nations agencies, including the UN Human Rights Commission (precursor to the current UN Human Rights Council).

As a co-convener with Jaribu Hill of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, Baraka played an instrumental role in developing the series of bi-annual Southern Human Rights Organizers’ conferences (SHROC) that began in 1996. These gatherings represented some of the first post-Cold War human rights training opportunities for grassroots activists in the country.

Baraka played an important role in bringing a human rights perspective to the preparatory meetings for the World Conference on Racism (WCAR) that took place in Geneva and in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Latin American Preparatory process, as well as the actual conference that he attended as a delegate in Durban, South Africa, in 2001.

Meet Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

A human rights defender whose experience spans four decades of domestic and international education and activism, Ajamu Baraka is a veteran grassroots organizer whose roots are in the Black Liberation Movement and anti-apartheid and Central American solidarity struggles.

Baraka is an internationally recognized leader of the emerging human rights movement in the U.S. and has been at the forefront of efforts to apply the international human rights framework to social justice advocacy in the U.S. for more than 25 years. As such, he has provided human rights trainings for grassroots activists across the country, has given briefings on human rights to the U.S. Congress, and has appeared before and provided statements to various United Nations agencies, including the UN Human Rights Commission (precursor to the current UN Human Rights Council).

As a co-convener with Jaribu Hill of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, Baraka played an instrumental role in developing the series of bi-annual Southern Human Rights Organizers’ conferences (SHROC) that began in 1996. These gatherings represented some of the first post-Cold War human rights training opportunities for grassroots activists in the country.

Baraka played an important role in bringing a human rights perspective to the preparatory meetings for the World Conference on Racism (WCAR) that took place in Geneva and in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Latin American Preparatory process, as well as the actual conference that he attended as a delegate in Durban, South Africa, in 2001.

Meet Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

A Real Choice: Jill Stein / Ajamu Baraka

Stein says this election year presents an important historic opportunity to work together right now just to break through this stranglehold and challenge the two parties right out of the gate because the meaningful benchmark for third parties would be to win 5 percent of the popular vote which would lead the Federal Election Commission to confer the classification of “minor party,” which means they’d get easier ballot access and be eligible for matching public funds.

Dr. Jill Stein was the Green Party’s 2012 candidate for President. She holds the current record for most votes ever received by a woman candidate for President of the United States in the general election. She is a mother, an organizer, physician, and pioneering environmental-health advocate.

The 2016 presidential race features two of the most disliked candidates in electoral history, which has given a boost to Jill Stein, a 66-year-old Harvard-trained physician from Massachusetts who’s running on the Green Party ticket.

For instance, Stein favors a single-payer health care system, which she claims would cost taxpayers nothing. She also says she would pour federal money into the clean energy sector and end our use of fossil fuels by the year 2030.

Stein is the only candidate bold enough to address the epidemic problem with vaccine poisoning threaten and entire future generation and has been battling the perception that the Green Party is anti-vaccine after she told the Washington Post that there were real questions that needed to be addressed especially with regards to small amounts of mercury once found in childhood vaccines.

Stein calls the media coverage of her statements misleading and characterizes it as the “birther” issue of this election, claiming that she’s only calling for reforms to the FDA, which she sees as corrupted by lobbyists.

But because of the biased media control, the majority of voters are not even aware that Jill Stein and Gary Johnson are legitimate presidential candidates under the Green and Liberal Parties, respectively; and hardly if anything know what their running position statements are.

As a practicing physician, Jill became aware of the links between toxic exposures and illness emerging in the 1990s. She began to fight for a healthy environment as a human right, assisting non profits, community groups and Native Americans combating environmental injustice and racism in dangerous exposures like lead and mercury in air and water pollution, incinerators and land fills, toxic waste sites and more. She helped lead the fight to clean up the “Filthy Five” coal plants in Massachusetts, raising the bar nationally to a cleaner standard for coal plants. She helped close a toxic medical waste incinerator in Lawrence, MA, one of the poorest communities in New England. She played a key role in rewriting the Massachusetts fish advisories to better protect women and children, Native Americans and immigrants from mercury contamination. She also helped preserve the moratorium on new toxic trash incinerators in Massachusetts.

Having witnessed the power of lobbyists and campaign contributions to block health, environmental and worker protections, Jill became an advocate for campaign finance reform, and worked to help pass the Clean Election Law by voter referendum. This law was passed by a 2-1 margin, but was later repealed by the overwhelmingly Democratic Massachusetts Legislature on an unrecorded voice vote. This sabotage of campaign finance reform by the Democratic Party was a pivotal event in Jill’s political development, confirming her growing allegiance to the Green Party.

jill-stein

Meet Jill Stein

 

 

 

Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

Baraka is a human rights defender whose experience spans four decades of domestic and international education and activism, Ajamu Baraka is a veteran grassroots organizer whose roots are in the Black Liberation Movement and anti-apartheid and Central American solidarity struggles.

Baraka is an internationally recognized leader of the emerging human rights movement in the U.S. and has been at the forefront of efforts to apply the international human rights framework to social justice advocacy in the U.S. for more than 25 years. As such, he has provided human rights trainings for grassroots activists across the country, has given briefings on human rights to the U.S. Congress, and has appeared before and provided statements to various United Nations agencies, including the UN Human Rights Commission (precursor to the current UN Human Rights Council).

As a co-convener with Jaribu Hill of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, Baraka played an instrumental role in developing the series of bi-annual Southern Human Rights Organizers’ conferences (SHROC) that began in 1996. These gatherings represented some of the first post-Cold War human rights training opportunities for grassroots activists in the country.

Baraka played an important role in bringing a human rights perspective to the preparatory meetings for the World Conference on Racism (WCAR) that took place in Geneva and in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Latin American Preparatory process, as well as the actual conference that he attended as a delegate in Durban, South Africa, in 2001.

Meet Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

A human rights defender whose experience spans four decades of domestic and international education and activism, Ajamu Baraka is a veteran grassroots organizer whose roots are in the Black Liberation Movement and anti-apartheid and Central American solidarity struggles.

Baraka is an internationally recognized leader of the emerging human rights movement in the U.S. and has been at the forefront of efforts to apply the international human rights framework to social justice advocacy in the U.S. for more than 25 years. As such, he has provided human rights trainings for grassroots activists across the country, has given briefings on human rights to the U.S. Congress, and has appeared before and provided statements to various United Nations agencies, including the UN Human Rights Commission (precursor to the current UN Human Rights Council).

As a co-convener with Jaribu Hill of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, Baraka played an instrumental role in developing the series of bi-annual Southern Human Rights Organizers’ conferences (SHROC) that began in 1996. These gatherings represented some of the first post-Cold War human rights training opportunities for grassroots activists in the country.

Baraka played an important role in bringing a human rights perspective to the preparatory meetings for the World Conference on Racism (WCAR) that took place in Geneva and in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Latin American Preparatory process, as well as the actual conference that he attended as a delegate in Durban, South Africa, in 2001.

Meet Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

Jill Stein for President

Stein says this election year presents an important historic opportunity to work together right now just to break through this stranglehold and challenge the two parties right out of the gate because the meaningful benchmark for third parties would be to win 5 percent of the popular vote which would lead the Federal Election Commission to confer the classification of “minor party,” which means they’d get easier ballot access and be eligible for matching public funds.

Dr. Jill Stein was the Green Party’s 2012 candidate for President. She holds the current record for most votes ever received by a woman candidate for President of the United States in the general election. She is a mother, an organizer, physician, and pioneering environmental-health advocate.

The 2016 presidential race features two of the most disliked candidates in electoral history, which has given a boost to Jill Stein, a 66-year-old Harvard-trained physician from Massachusetts who’s running on the Green Party ticket.

For instance, Stein favors a single-payer health care system, which she claims would cost taxpayers nothing. She also says she would pour federal money into the clean energy sector and end our use of fossil fuels by the year 2030.

Stein is the only candidate bold enough to address the epidemic problem with vaccine poisoning threaten and entire future generation and has been battling the perception that the Green Party is anti-vaccine after she told the Washington Post that there were real questions that needed to be addressed especially with regards to small amounts of mercury once found in childhood vaccines.

Stein calls the media coverage of her statements misleading and characterizes it as the “birther” issue of this election, claiming that she’s only calling for reforms to the FDA, which she sees as corrupted by lobbyists.

But because of the biased media control, the majority of voters are not even aware that Jill Stein and Gary Johnson are legitimate presidential candidates under the Green and Liberal Parties, respectively; and hardly if anything know what their running position statements are.

jill-stein

As a practicing physician, Jill became aware of the links between toxic exposures and illness emerging in the 1990s. She began to fight for a healthy environment as a human right, assisting non profits, community groups and Native Americans combating environmental injustice and racism in dangerous exposures like lead and mercury in air and water pollution, incinerators and land fills, toxic waste sites and more. She helped lead the fight to clean up the “Filthy Five” coal plants in Massachusetts, raising the bar nationally to a cleaner standard for coal plants. She helped close a toxic medical waste incinerator in Lawrence, MA, one of the poorest communities in New England. She played a key role in rewriting the Massachusetts fish advisories to better protect women and children, Native Americans and immigrants from mercury contamination. She also helped preserve the moratorium on new toxic trash incinerators in Massachusetts.

Having witnessed the power of lobbyists and campaign contributions to block health, environmental and worker protections, Jill became an advocate for campaign finance reform, and worked to help pass the Clean Election Law by voter referendum. This law was passed by a 2-1 margin, but was later repealed by the overwhelmingly Democratic Massachusetts Legislature on an unrecorded voice vote. This sabotage of campaign finance reform by the Democratic Party was a pivotal event in Jill’s political development, confirming her growing allegiance to the Green Party.

Meet Jill Stein

Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka

ajamu-baraka

A human rights defender whose experience spans four decades of domestic and international education and activism, Ajamu Baraka is a veteran grassroots organizer whose roots are in the Black Liberation Movement and anti-apartheid and Central American solidarity struggles.

Baraka is an internationally recognized leader of the emerging human rights movement in the U.S. and has been at the forefront of efforts to apply the international human rights framework to social justice advocacy in the U.S. for more than 25 years. As such, he has provided human rights trainings for grassroots activists across the country, has given briefings on human rights to the U.S. Congress, and has appeared before and provided statements to various United Nations agencies, including the UN Human Rights Commission (precursor to the current UN Human Rights Council).

As a co-convener with Jaribu Hill of the Mississippi Workers’ Center for Human Rights, Baraka played an instrumental role in developing the series of bi-annual Southern Human Rights Organizers’ conferences (SHROC) that began in 1996. These gatherings represented some of the first post-Cold War human rights training opportunities for grassroots activists in the country.

Baraka played an important role in bringing a human rights perspective to the preparatory meetings for the World Conference on Racism (WCAR) that took place in Geneva and in Santiago, Chile, as part of the Latin American Preparatory process, as well as the actual conference that he attended as a delegate in Durban, South Africa, in 2001.

Meet Stein’s Running mate: Ajamu Baraka